Tag Archive | teen fiction

Non-Spoiler Book Review | “Hunting Prince Dracula,” by Kerri Maniscalco

Again, an amazing, intriguing and intense story by the wonderful Maniscalco.

4.5/5 Stars

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In this story, we follow Audrey Rose and her friend Thomas to Romania, where they are to compete for a spot in a prestigious forensic studies school. The twist in this story is that they are going where the infamous Dracula lived—the school is situated in his castle.

A quick history lesson for you guys, Prince Vlad Dracula reigned in the Country of Romania around the 1600s and when he died people believed he turned into a vampire. This book was written in a late 1800s perspective and I find it fascinating the way the author makes these connections and chooses these myths and folklore to create an amazing story. Maniscalco manages to fuse both, history and fiction in a way that will have you at the edge of your chair with goosebumps all over your body.

We meet a variety of different characters and I must say that I despised the headmaster of the school, but there were some interesting developments throughout the story. I also loved how she incorporated a romance that, in that period of time, would have been seen as wrong and unforgiving—but that didn’t stop the author from bringing that aspect in, which I found very brave. You’ll see what I’m talking about once you read the book.

In other words, if you like solving mysteries, page-turning thrillers, murder investigation, and you are curious about Dracula, then this is the perfect book for you. With the right amount of romance, action, and suspense, Maniscalco will have you craving for me after each page. I cannot wait for the next to come out, “Escaping Houdini,” I’m so excited.

I recommend it to 14+ years-old.

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Non-Spoiler Book Review | “Stalking Jack the Ripper,” by Kerri Maniscalco.

4/5 stars

This was a very interesting story that dealt with postmortems, forensic sciences, and cadavers–I mean, who doesn’t want to read a book like this? Maniscalco brings us this very intriguing story (that I consider more of a spinoff) about Jack the Ripper and A little bit of history behind Jack the Ripper, for those of you who don’t know, he was a serial killer from England that murdered women in the late 1800s. Anyways, back to the story, Audrey Rose is our main character and she’s full of curiosity and an insatiable passion for the forensic sciences.

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Nathaniel is her brother whom she loves and her father is crazy, oh and her uncle is a forensic scientist that she apprentices under. The book was written in the time period of the late 1800s so you can imagine all the formalities and social classes and royale tea parties and all that jazz. Maniscalco writes beautifully and very detailed scenes that include customs from that era. Those were one of the aspects that made this book very interesting. Thomas was another interesting factor in this book–he plays our love interest, but he’s infuriating as he is charming. He managed to get in Miss Wadsworth neves as much as he managed to get on mine (LOL), but he was very cute and I look forward to reading more about him in the next books.

The fact that she decided to incorporate Jack the Ripper into this story makes it even more interesting, and I cannot wait to read the next book. I honestly was kinda skeptic about reading this book because it was a James Patterson publishing and I could care less about James Patterson in general, but that’s why I didn’t give it a try. However, I truly enjoyed this book and cannot wait to read more books by this author. I would recommend this book to anyone 14 years and older.

Non-Spoiler Book Review, “The Museum of Heartbreak,” by Meg Leder

4/5 stars

This was an awesome cute read. College and work won’t allow me to read as much as I want to, and well, I can never find time to review books anymore, even if I end up reading them. I have so many hand written reviews that I haven’t had chance to publish them here.

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Okay, back to the review, this was such a cute refreshing read. Penelope Marx is our main character and she’s very much like all of us. Or more so like me, because I don’t know how you guys are, lol. She believes in fairytales and happy endings and true love, and loves fictional boyfriends, etc. She experiences her first crush with this new kid that comes to school, and well, you can imagine how everything goes from there.

This is a story about friendship, growing apart, and then finding each other. It’s about heartbreak and unexpected love. The storyline is very interesting and the writing is cohesive and makes a lot of sense. I never felt like I got lost in the story and the book maintained a peaceful flow. I truly enjoyed reading this fluffy romance book, and I would recommend it for readers 14 and up.

Non-Spoiler Book Review | “Shuffle, Repeat,” by Jen Klein

4/5 stars

This was a beautiful book with an amazing story. I think it has DUFF and Easy A vibes. I enjoyed reading this book a lot, more than I expected, and this is my first book by this author and I’m very satisfied with it.

26067503This book follows the story of June and Oliver. June’s mom and Oliver’s mom arrange for both of them to ride together to school. June doesn’t like this arrangement, but there’s nothing she can do about it. June and Oliver know each other, or knew each other–but then they grew up, and high school happened. June believes that High School traditions are stupid and can’t wait to go to college to leave all of that stupidity behind. Oliver, on the other hand, believes that high school is all there is and that you need to make your high school years the best because you will remember them forever.

Since they have different opinions about high school, they argue most of the time, and to pass the time they listen to music on their way over to the school, hence the title. This story is full of fun, humor, lies, friendship, and future. I would recommend this story to anyone who’s having conflicting feelings about high school or college, and how two strangers can overcome anything, and find the truth in their hearts. 14 and up could read this. Enjoy!

 

 

Non-Spoiler Book Review | “Eliza and Her Monsters,” By Francesca Zappia

4/5 stars

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I really enjoyed reading this book. The last book that I read by this author was “Made you up,” about a year ago, and I really did love it. This one did not disappoint. Francesca’s writing is beautiful and consistent, and I’m very curious as to see if she was the one who drew the art for her book because it is seriously amazing.

Eliza is the creator of a very popular web comic, and when I mean popular, I mean really popular. Like people have tattoos over her webcomic popular. Millions of people read her comic. But no one knows who she is in real life.

In school, she’s treated as a dork and a freak, and one day she decides to stand up for this kid, Wallace, because he was being bullied, or well, pressured is the most correct term. Anyways, he discovers that she likes Monstrous Sea, which is the web comic that she creates. Some pages fall out of the sketchbook she always has in hand and he sees them, but he doesn’t think that she’s the creator. I mean why would he. Anywho, they form a connection over the web comic, which in terms turns into romance, and I like it because Eliza is getting out of her comfort zone, and is the cutest thing to see her get all flustered when he directs any of the attention to her.

This story is about, love, trust, depression, because Jesus, Eliza is always depressed or in a mood. But it is also about friendship and losing people who are very close to you. Would recommend if you’ve read anything by Jennifer Niven, Jandy Nelson, Nicola Yoon, or Ned Vizzini.

Non-Spoiler Book Review | “Alex, Approximately,” by Jenn Bennett

5/5 stars

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Uhh! I loved this book so much. Like, I can’t get over how good this book was. This is my first book ever that I’ve read from this author, and I honestly don’t know if this is her first one, but she did a damn great job. She’s such an amazing writer, and I’m proud of her for writing this book. The story line was amazing, the characters were super strong in terms of personality and character development, and the plot twist was different than what I was expecting but in a good way.

Enter Baily, aka Mink. She’s been talking to this guy, Alex, for a while online about movies and stuff, and he’s been inviting her to go to this film festival that happens in his town in California. They don’t know each other outside of the online chat, they don’t know their real names, nor where they live or none of that. The only that Bailey knows is that the town he lives in is where her dad lives and that she’s moving in with him. They have a great connection online, and Baily likes him a lot.

Bailey is sort of paranoid because of something that happened to her in the past, and that’s why she doesn’t tell Alex that she recently moved to his hometown, so instead she’s decided to find him on her own with the couple of clues and information he’s provided her over the time they’ve been talking.

Now, in the midst of finding Alex, Bailey gets a job and meets this guy named Porter, and OMG, Porter is sooooo sexy! Like I have him on my top 20 fav book boyfriend list. He’s a real jerk to her on the beginning, which immediately told me that he liked her. But, of course, Bailey can’t stand him. Uhhh! Did I mention that he was a surfer?

Anyways, that’s the line of the story and you have to read to find out about everything else. But I really did enjoy this cute story. It’s the perfect summer read! It talks about a summer romance, movies, surfing in Californian beaches, and more! BTW, the romance in this book is hot! The author doesn’t go into specific detail about what the characters do but she does make it happen. Anyone, 16 years and older can read! Would most certainly recommend!

Non-Spoiler Book Review | “When It’s Real,” by Erin Watt

3.5/5 stars

I did not like this story as much as I thought I was going to. First of all, the plot and story line are all wrong. The author decided to focus on the least important thing to develop the story. Second, the language of the book, the way the author wrote the characters was awful. I don’t know how old she is, but I don’t think she’s young enough to understand teen’s lingo these days. The way she wrote this story made it seem like she has two teenage children and she overheard them talk and then copied their conversation into the pages. I’m not even joking, some of the conversation between characters are so bad, that they made me cringe, and not in a good way.

She also writes without sentiment, which can be a good thing or a bad thing. But in this case, it felt like a bad thing. When you read her books, she doesn’t compare the characters emotion with anything. When she’s having the characters talk to each other, you don’t feel like their genuine because she focuses more on the physical part of the conversation instead of the emotional. When I’m reading a book, I want to make sure I feel what the character is saying and thinking. It’s a book, it’s supposed to 30731416make me feel their emotions. I don’t want to know that someone turns barely to the side, and she was talking. If I wanted that I would watch a movie.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t think is bad that she went this route with her book, and I know some of you even appreciate it because she doesn’t get as poetical as the other authors. But when you read this book, you learn to appreciate the second-hand opinion that characters when describing things, people, or feelings–because you have a base of comparison, and as readers, it helps us a lot to understand what the character is going through.

I felt like there were so many things that she could have addressed in this, and others that honestly, she did not need to mention. Like, for example, Erin did not fully develop the actual emotions that Vaughn could have been feeling towards her parents. She could have gotten more into depth for that aspect. Also, she could have addressed Oakley’s relationship with his parents a little bit better. Oak has a strained relationship with his parents but it was also a great point to focus on for part of the story, instead of him going to stupid clubs for stupid reasons. Like, that was not as important as to solve his parents’ mystery.

The story itself had a lot of potentials, and if she would have gotten a different route with her plot twist, the book could have been way better. Something else that I didn’t like was how stupid the plot line was, I don’t want to give anything away, but I felt like there were more things that she could have made their “breaking point.” And she should have brought that plot twist part, (you know, the part where-everything-goes-wrong-before-it-gets-right part), sooner. She literally did it at the end, and not the middle end, but like a few pages from the end, giving us little to no space to wonder for the what if, or even the epilogue.